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The Yamaha CLP525 vs the new CLP625- let's take a look at the changes 

CLP625

So the first model in the range is the CLP625, replacing the CLP525 this model now provides a much bigger jump up from the next model down in the Arius series, the YDP163.




The first thing to talk about is that the sound of the CLP625 compared to its predecessor, the CLP525 is a vast improvement now that the samples of the Bösendorfer Imperial and the Yamaha CFX grand pianos have been included. These offer rich tones to be played, and the brighter Yamaha sample compliments the much mellower Bösendorfer sound giving you a nice choice.

The CLP625 also offers the new GH3X keyboard which Yamaha have been developing, and it now included synthetic ebony black notes as well as the synthetic Ivory white keys.
These include 'escapement' an accuracy usually only found on grand pianos and Yamaha's 'smooth release' giving you a more realistic feel.

You'll find, being the authentic ebony and ivory the keys offer you a more grippy feel, and less sloppy like the texture of the lower YDP163 model.

Looking at the cabinet you'll see the nice new shapely front legs and the efficient page holders previously only available on higher models which should ensure your music book doesn't close as you're trying to play something a bit more demanding.


The CLP625 is now available in four colours, these included Matt black, Rosewood, shiny black and the new colour to this model Matt White.

Two new features have also been included in all of the new Clavinova CLP models including the CLP625 known as 'binaural sampling' and the 'stereo optimiser'. These new features help you to hear the sound like you would when playing a real grand piano- so when playing both through the speakers and even through headphones the sound will appear to come from the speakers nearest to where the strings would be positioned on a real piano. So playing the lower bass notes the sound will come from the left speakers and through the left speakers on your headphones and this will enhance the overall experience you get when playing.
Now you get 10 sounds to choose from, these include 3 acoustic piano samples, 2 electric piano samples, a harpsichord, a couple of organs, vibraphone and strings. You also have the opportunity to select two sounds together, so when playing a piano something like orchestral strings can fill out the sound and effects like sustain and reverb will enhance the combinations to offer a much more varied choice of full sounds.

This model also has the option to link up to an Ipad, Ipod or Iphone for better navigation of the products facilities on their touch screen. This allows you to save instrument mixes, select voices and make many other adjustments from the touch screen on your device.  See the link below for more details.

Another new feature, which like many of Yamaha's great ideas, has taken a while to catch on and now be used by teachers, beginners and duet players is 'duo mode', this feature enables the keyboard to be split and both players gets a 1/2 portion of the instrument and in the same range too.

Recording, even on this entry level Clavinova offers you some great features. You can now record two individual tracks into the instruments memory and then join in over the top on playback and have a duet with yourself - and with the optional BT01 interface you can now connect your iPhone, iPad or iPod touch to your CLP625 piano and use it to play a backing track, or a favourite piece of music, allowing you to join in with it.

Conclusion

The Yamaha CLP625 offers some great improvements to the CLP525 and even when playing the instrument with headphones at the show I immediately noticed the improvement of sound- and the affects of the new key action.

First impressions are that it all looks very similar to the CLP525- but once you get playing and fiddling you can see and hear  the benefits and i think its a big improvement

This is the only CLP model which works with the Digital piano controller Controller App which is great for ease of navigation

For more details see our website CLP625 Details or watch our comparison video filmed at the recent Frankfurt product launch Product Video




Comments

  1. he anticipation of that action could affect the rest of the swing. Digital Piano Reviews

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